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Camping Trip Ends in Tragedy for Three Men

Tips-to-Avoid-Carbon-Monoxide-Poisoning

(ModernSurvival.org) – A weekend camping trip at Michigan’s Faster Horses Festival became a death trap for three men on Saturday, July 17. Carbon monoxide filled up the camping trailer the young men were staying in, leading to their deaths. Police believe the carbon monoxide likely came from a nearby portable generator.

In total, five men were found unresponsive inside the trailer when police arrived. Despite the best efforts by rescuers on the scene, three of the five passed away before they could be taken to the hospital. The two surviving men are currently in critical condition.

The loss of these young men is a horrifying wake-up call about the dangers of carbon monoxide, an odorless gas that is lethal in high concentrations.

Tips to Avoid Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning isn’t a threat to be taken lightly. It is lethal, and because the gas is odorless, it can be impossible to detect without the proper equipment. Reports from the CDC indicate that 430 people, on average, die each year due to carbon monoxide poisoning.

Obviously, the best way to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning is to install a carbon monoxide detector in the home, and in the RV. But that is just the start. Here are some tips to avoid letting carbon monoxide accumulate inside any structure:

  • Never use a gas grill or camping stove indoors. Many people will bring these indoors during a power outage in an attempt to stay warm or cook food. This is a huge mistake.
  • Never use portable generators indoors, or nearby windows, doorways, camper trailers, or tents.
  • Check fireplaces and woodstoves. The screen to the ventilation pipes can become covered with soot or other debris, causing the carbon monoxide to back up into the home.
  • Never run an automobile, or any gasoline-powered engine, inside an enclosed area, such as the garage.
  • Place multiple carbon monoxide detectors in the home. These should be placed anywhere there is a possibility of carbon monoxide being produced, such as by the furnace or in the kitchen.

The symptoms of CO poisoning include dull headaches, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, blurry vision, confusion and the loss of consciousness. For those who are intoxicated or sleeping when the poisoning occurs, the symptoms are often never noticed, making it all the more dangerous.

If CO poisoning is suspected, leave the area immediately and seek medical attention. Carbon monoxide poisoning can lead to severe health issues, such as irreversible brain damage. Get help as quickly as possible.

~Here’s to Your Survival!

Copyright 2021, ModernSurvival.org

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